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The Ultimate Guide to Starting Your Career in Tech Sales | Part 2 - Qualifications, Attributes and Experience needed

Alma Dassa, School Team @ Jolt
|
August 27, 2021
What qualifications and attributes does an SDR need?

It appears that many of the skills and traits required for the job of SDR fall under the umbrella of soft skills, and thus a claim by Aviram Ganor, VP Sales at Riskified, with regard to the importance of sales people as such comes as no surprise: “Most tend to believe that the parameter that most influences deal-closing is the price, but studies show that only 9% of deals are closed due to price, while more than 50% of deals are closed because the sales person succeeded in actively influencing the sales process.”

What experience does an SDR need?

A report published by The Bridge Group, which provides consultation services to B2B companies directed towards optimizing business and sales development strategies, indicates that the required experience of SDRs employed in recent years dropped significantly and that 41% of the companies interviewed for the report hired SDRs with experience of less than an year ( and an additional 42% hired SDRs with one to two years of experience). In addition, job descriptions indicate that 9 out of 21 hiring companies describe the job as an entry level position that requires professional experience in sales or work with customers (and not necessarily in the specific job of SDR).

Sample descriptions of current SDR positions
Example #1 (1)

We’re growing and looking for a passionate Sales Development Representative (SDR)!

The ideal candidate is an energetic self-starter with the ability to identify relevant prospects, influencers, and key decision-makers within accounts. You will discover qualified opportunities by responding to inbound interests and targeted outbound prospects to build rapport and establish long-term relationships.

Responsibilities
Qualifications
Skills

Seniority Level: Entry level

Example #2 (2)
The Role:

As a Sales Development Representative, your day to day will be rooted in hybrid Inbound/Outbound lead management. The most important part of your job is collaborating with sales executives on strategic plans for opening discussions, creating relationships, and building a pipeline of future customers.

Being the first point of contact with prospective customers, this position is critical to the growth of our business. We are seeking people that can perform the task with exceptional customer experience while demonstrating the positive impact of our product.

This is an opportunity to take your sales skills to the next level by selling a fascinating, sophisticated, technical product that immediately delivers value.

Why Should You Join?
What You'll Do
What You Should Have?

Seniority Level: Entry level


Example #3 (3)

We are seeking a highly motivated Sales Development Representative professional to join our great Fintech team.

Responsibilities
Requirements

So why do so few of us have creative breaks?

Because almost everything will work again if you unplug it for a few minutes. Including you.

Charles Darwin took long walks around London. Kurt Vonnegut made listening to jazz a daily priority. Fiona Apple disappeared for 6 years after the release of her third album.

So why do so few of us have creative breaks?
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I ask because I can often be found agonising over the "more". If only I posted on Instagram more, I'll think in the bath. I'd have more followers if I pitched to more publications. I need to post 2 more times a week, minimum. I could go on...

Between you and me, I've got frustrated with myself for browsing Facebook or watching too much TV more times than I can remember.

And I'm not alone. So many of us are terrified of taking a break, creatively speaking. We won't let a moment pass without listening to a podcast, consuming an article or sharing something.

The cognitive load is real, y'all.

But like Vitamin D, sleep and good food, it's not only ok to take a break, it's essential.

Living a successful life is also about knowing when not to work. For your best output, you need to focus on your input, too.

The world won't end if you disappear from the internet for a week or so. Your creativity won't suddenly stop. Your time is now, but your time was also then and it will be again.

Your dreams don't have an expiration date.

Many of us confuse being "busy" with being constructive. But you can only do your best work by taking breaks.

And science backs it up, too. The brain requires substantial downtime to do its most innovative thinking. The ideas you have while driving or in the shower aren't coincidental. They're a result of you taking a step back, whether you're aware of it or not.

Here's a challenge for you

Let yourself take a wonderful and indulgent break. Several breaks. Hell, get downright bored.

Put airplane mode on for a while. Sit down. Lie down. Be still. Do nothing. Observe. Listen to your mind. Let it do what it does without judging it.

Wallow in it. Don't be afraid of it. Push it as far as you can.

When you leave your laptop behind, something always happens. A new idea or a fresh perspective appears.

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"A spark of inspiration needs an empty cave."

Take proper breaks, often. Completely clear your mind. Your next best idea depends on it.

Taken by over 18,500 people; Calibrated by 100s of tech employees

By taking this 10-min test I can set myself up for success

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